A Single Vote

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#47: “A Single Vote”
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Scripture
Matthew 22:21
21"Caesar's," they replied. Then he said to them, "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's."

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Current user rating: 93/100 (48 votes)

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A Single Vote
“A Single Vote” is episode #47 of the Adventures in Odyssey audio series. It was written and directed by Phil Lollar, and originally aired on November 5, 1988.

Summary

Connie learns from Whit about how every vote matters.

Plot

Horace Higgenbotham is running for president of the student body at Odyssey Elementary. Whit has let the candidates hold a rally at Whit's End. Thanks to some free ice cream, the kids are all there and are excited. But Connie is sick of the whole thing. She feels that one vote can't possibly make a difference. So Whit proceeds to prove her wrong.

Whit tells her and everyone listening about a man named Jamison Shoemaker, whose story ends in the territory of Texas during 1845. Territorial President Sam Houston waits anxiously for word on the vote for Texas statehood. Texas needs 36 congressional votes, and Houston is not certain they have them. Suddenly, a messenger bursts in to deliver the news: Texas has become the 28th state-by a margin of one vote, cast by Harrigan, a senator from Indiana.

This leads to the next phase of the story, which happened six years earlier in Indiana. The legislators had gathered in Indianapolis for an important vote to elect a senator. One of those legislators was a man named Madison Marsh. Marsh elicited advice from his advisors, then decided to cast his vote for Harrigan, who was confirmed as a senator - by Marsh's one vote!

All of this finally leads to Jamison Shoemaker. It's Election Day, 1837. Shoemaker is out plowing his field and nearly misses his chance to vote, rushing to town and casting his ballot just before the polls close. The ballots are counted, and the new representative to the Indiana state legislator is Madison Marsh. Shoemaker realizes that's the fellow he voted for - and Marsh won by that one vote!

One ordinary man with one ordinary vote was directly responsible for Texas becoming a state. As Whit tells us, it's all a part of our Maker's plan.

Discussion Questions

  1. Why is it important to vote?
  2. Read Matthew 22:21. In our country, who is the ruling authority?
  3. Name some other instances where one person made a big difference.

Cast

Heard in episode

Role Voice Actor
Abraham Lincoln Bob Luttrell
Mr. Baehr Chuck Bolte
Chairman Unknown
Connie Kendall Katie Leigh
Courier Dave Arnold
Homer Bob Luttrell
Horace Higgenbotham Chad Reisser
Jamison Shoemaker Will Ryan
John Whittaker Hal Smith
Jones Phil Lollar
Mr. Lang Will Ryan
Madison Marsh Walker Edmiston
Richard Reynolds Walker Edmiston
Sam Houston Will Ryan
Thompson Bob Luttrell
Tom Riley Walker Edmiston
Whip Paul McCusker

Mentioned in episode

Character Mentioned By
June Kendall Connie Kendall

Notes

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Reviews

Quotes

Horace Higgenbotham: Wow! If he were alive today, he'd be dead!

Chris Anthony: Y-you talked!
Lincoln Monument: I know. It's amazing what you can do on radio, isn't it?

Tom Riley: Well, for what it's worth, Horace, I'll back ya. I caught your speech a couple minutes ago and it sounded good—a real barn burner!

John Whittaker: Which is the second reason I don't believe it was coincidental.
Connie Kendall: And that is?
John Whittaker: I don't believe anything is coincidental.

Connie Kendall: You know, it amazes me how you can take any subject and relate it to God or the Bible.
John Whittaker: Thank you. I'll take that as a compliment.